◆ Thoughts and daily drawings by illustrator Misa Saburi ◆

Speakers getting ready to speak. 

Alexandre Singh’s awesome show at The Drawing Center had a talk where the artist was interviewed by The New Yorker’s Andrea Scott, based on the same questions he asked people like Michel Gondry, Danny Rubin (director of Groundhog Day) in preparation to this project and some from the Proust questionnaire.
Some ideas from the conversation that came to me: 
I wonder if the American audience requires more obvious explanations than Singh’s European audience? I’d guess so.
I wonder if he likes Barry Yourgrau.
For some people (the curator in this case), “Um” seems to be the loudest word they say into the microphone
I agree with Singh, Americans say “like” too often
And I also agree, writers should have a limited number for using the word “suddenly.” I thought it might be a good exercise for me to watch a video where something quick happens and I have to explain it without using the word “suddenly” or “all of a sudden.” The prose that come from this could be of an elongated moment described poetically, as if reading about a slow-motion clip.
I also wished that the interviewer focused more on letting the artist talk. She interrupted strangely and often, drawing too much attention to irrelevant moments. 

Speakers getting ready to speak. 

Alexandre Singh’s awesome show at The Drawing Center had a talk where the artist was interviewed by The New Yorker’s Andrea Scott, based on the same questions he asked people like Michel Gondry, Danny Rubin (director of Groundhog Day) in preparation to this project and some from the Proust questionnaire.

Some ideas from the conversation that came to me: 

  • I wonder if the American audience requires more obvious explanations than Singh’s European audience? I’d guess so.
  • I wonder if he likes Barry Yourgrau.
  • For some people (the curator in this case), “Um” seems to be the loudest word they say into the microphone
  • I agree with Singh, Americans say “like” too often
  • And I also agree, writers should have a limited number for using the word “suddenly.” I thought it might be a good exercise for me to watch a video where something quick happens and I have to explain it without using the word “suddenly” or “all of a sudden.” The prose that come from this could be of an elongated moment described poetically, as if reading about a slow-motion clip.

I also wished that the interviewer focused more on letting the artist talk. She interrupted strangely and often, drawing too much attention to irrelevant moments. 

  • 7 March 2013
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